Archive for the ‘Factoids’ Category

Armstrong Ranch/Kenedy County Factoids

February 13, 2006

The Armstrong Ranch is in Kenedy County, Texas.  Here are a few factoids about the place for your reading pleasure.

The largest of the ranches was the King Ranch, founded in 1847 by Mifflin Kenedy and his partner Richard King, who acquired their vast holdings by both legal and questionable means. In the early 1880s, for example, Kenedy reportedly fenced in a lake that by tradition belonged to Doña Euliana Tijerina of the La Atravesada grant. To enforce their rule the Kings often called on the Texas Rangers,qv whom locals sometimes referred to as los rinches de la Kineña-the King Ranch Texas Rangers. Commenting on such practices, an anonymous newspaper article in 1878 averred that it was not unusual for King’s neighbors "to mysteriously disappear whilst his territory extends over entire counties." (Source)

Questionable means? Texas Rangers as enforcers?  Disappearing neighbors?  Kenedy County sounds like darn near paradise for the Bush-Cheney Crowd.

Armstrong_tx_po

Why does the Armstrong Ranch have it’s own
Post Office right outside the gate?

Between 1940 and 1960 the population of Kenedy County grew from 700 to 884. Afterward, it steadily declined; in 1990 the county had only 460 residents and was therefore one of the least populous counties in the state. Sarita, the only town of any size, had 185 inhabitants in 1990, when, with a population about 80 percent Hispanic, Kenedy County ranked near the top among all United States counties in percentage of Hispanic residents. (Source)

The total population for Kenedy County in 2000 was 414.  In 1999, there were a total of 5 people in the county that made over $200,000 a year.  There are about 120 people in the workforce in the county and 83 of those work for the government.

Sure Shootin’ there’s got to be some of that Texas funny business going on with that Post Office.

Gunshotdivider

Fun Foggo Facts

January 20, 2006

Here’s some fun Foggo facts for your reading pleasure drawn from the world wide web.

The Executive Director of the Central Intelligence Agency is K.D. “Dusty” Foggo. Assisted by an Executive Board and the Directorate of Support, the EXDIR manages the CIA on a day-to day basis. (Source)

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Image of “Dusty” Foggo (Source)

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The critical position of executive director–the person responsible for actually running the CIA day to day–is now going to a twenty-two-year agency veteran, but knowledgeable observers are less than optimistic about how the nominee, K. Dusty Foggo, will do, particularly with regard to fixing the agency’s very broken support functions. While Foggo has had ample field experience–his last overseas assignment was running the agency’s Germany-based forward logistics facility–his lack of senior headquarters-level posts may be inadequate preparation to run a 33,000-strong agency. “He hasn’t had a lot of give and take with the division chiefs or deputy directors, as well as equivalents at other agencies or on the Hill–at best, he’s not ready,” says one veteran. Some also note memorable overseas clashes between Foggo and DO officers and State Department personnel. (Source)
12-13-2004

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An intelligence source tells the Prospect that Wilkes’ company received at least one CIA contract – to supply CIA employees in Iraq with water, early into the invasion. Sources say such a contract may have been facilitated not only by the hundreds of thousands of dollars Wilkes steered to Cunningham, but also by the fact that Wilkes’ university roommate and long time friend is a recently promoted top CIA manager, K. “Dusty” Foggo… An intelligence source says that Wilkes even jokes about Foggo having a virtual office (“a playpen”) in Wilkes’ company’s offices in the Washington, D.C. suburbs of Chantilly, Virginia. (Source)
11-30-2005

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Born in San Diego County in 1954, Wilkes graduated from Hilltop High School in 1972, along with his football teammate and best friend Kyle Dustin “Dusty” Foggo, currently third-in-command at the Central Intelligence Agency. Wilkes and Foggo were roommates at San Diego State University, were best men at each other’s weddings and named their sons after each other.

Wilkes’ career in political relations dates to the early 1980s, shortly after Foggo joined the CIA. Foggo was sent to Honduras to work with the Contra rebels who were trying to topple the Sandinista government of Nicaragua, according to sources within the CIA. (Source)
12-4-05

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One current and two retired senior CIA officials told Government Executive that (as noted last week by reporter Laura Rozen in The American Prospect‘s the relationship of Wilkes and Foggo–who the CIA’s Web site declares is “under cover and cannot be named at this time,” even though he is pictured and identified on a federal charity webpage–has been a subject of increasing concern by some at Langley.

Another recently-retired senior agency official, while not naming Wilkes or Wade by name, also noted concerns borne out of both personal experience with and reports from colleagues about Foggo. “If you were a case officer and worked with him, you’d be saying to yourself, ‘I’ve got to watch this guy,'” says the former official. “There is one contractor with whom he enjoys a very, very, very close relationship.”

Foggo belonged to the DA’s Management General Services unit, whose personnel, while not case
officers who directly recruit and oversee spies, nonetheless received the same training as covert-action oriented Directorate of Operations officers.

MGS officers ran operational support programs in the field, a critical job directly below the agency’s station chiefs. MGS officers had unique powers, including sole access to and oversight of a station’s funds, as well as handling a station’s accounting and contracting.

“The MG guy is the station’s contracting authority, and is responsible for acquiring whatever a station needs to function, and to keep it running—the glue the holds it all together and gets anyone anything they need,” says a veteran logistics officer.

While most federal government contracts are openly solicited, competitively bid and have their details publicly available, by virtue of its mission the CIA is not subject to the same rules. MG officers in particular have historically had great leeway.

“While the process is the same as anywhere else–in theory, you go to the place you can get the best deal–you’re not going to find our stuff on the federal schedule, and the payment will come either through a company we set up or some other governmental cover,” says a recently-retired MGS veteran. “Historically MG officers have been able to sole-source, and for smaller contracts, in some cases up to the half-million range, have not needed Langley’s approval. A lot of smaller sole-source contracts can add up for a contractor.”

Prior to becoming executive director, Foggo’s postings included stations in Latin American and Europe. One of his first assignments was Honduras in the early 1980s, where one now-retired CIA officer recalls seeing him at least once with a visiting Brent Wilkes, who was there with “some kind of congressional delegation” in a “kind of vague” capacity.

Directly before coming executive director, Foggo was chief of the CIA’s support base in Germany, which provides its Middle East stations, including Baghdad, with logistical support. While there, according to a recently retired CIA official, he let at least one contract to Wilkes. A veteran CIA administrative officer also noted that while Foggo has spent most of his career as an MGS officer, he also did a stint in the agency’s Directorate of Science and Technology, “where a lot of really big contracts are handled.” (Source)
12-4-05

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So close are Wilkes and Kyle Dustin “Dusty” Foggo, the executive director of the CIA, that they named their sons after each other and share a private wine locker at Washington’s Capital Grille restaurant. The Prospect has previously reported allegations that a Wilkes-affiliated company called Archer Logistics, headed by Wilkes’ nephew and former ADCS employee Joel G. Combs, received a contract from the CIA. (Source)
(Cached) 1-14-06

And finally, Dusty was briefly with us in the Bureau of Investigation. I don’t recall, precisely, but I don’t think he was there long enough to get out of Witness Assistance. When Dusty left the Bureau I recall that even people such as myself, who really didn’t know him very well, were aware that he had gone to work for the CIA and was being assigned to Tegucigalpa, Honduras and had something to do with the Sandinista thing going on at the time. I recall seeing a post card he sent back from Honduras.

I believe he came to us from the San Diego Sheriff’s Office, and guess he probably wasn’t there long enough to get out of the jail.

Bodega Bay Area Real Estate Factoid

September 20, 2005

Here’s some Bodega Bay area real estate factoids for January 2005 – August 2005. 

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Bodega Harbour: 38 houses have sold so far this year in the Harbour. The average time  on the market was of 66 days. The average selling price was $1,082,325 which represents about 96.79% of the asking price.  The average house in the Harbour is selling for about 4% over the asking price.

Carmet: Only one house has been sold so far this year, at just over the asking price of $750,000.

Salmon Creek: 3 houses have sold so far this year, the average days on the market was 66 and the average selling price was $679,667 the average selling prices was actually 100.55% of the asking price.

Sereno del Mar: Of the 4 houses sold so far this year, the average days on the market was 65, the average selling price was $854,000, selling on the average at about 95.53% of the asking price.

Taylor Tract: 1 house has sold so far this year in the Village Area for 100% of the asking price of $449,000.

Bayside: 4 houses have sold so far this year.  The average price was $799.667 which is 100.46% of the asking price. The average days on the market was 66.

The average number of days on the market for homes sold in the Bodega Bay area is 72 days, which represents about a 32% drop from last years average of 105 days.

Don’t know if all this means there’s a real estate "bubble" around here or not.

Fun Gasoline Factoid II: Katrina & Oil

September 19, 2005

Here’s a report on what’s up with the oil pipelines, and refineries in the Gulf.

Keep on Pumping…

Keep_on_truckin_5

Fun Gasoline Factoid II: Katrina & Oil

September 19, 2005

Here’s a report on what’s up with the oil pipelines, and refineries in the Gulf.

Keep on Pumping…

Keep_on_truckin_5

(more…)

Fun Gasoline Factoid II: Katrina & Oil

September 19, 2005

Here’s a report on what’s up with the oil pipelines, and refineries in the Gulf.

Keep on Pumping…

Keep_on_truckin_5

(more…)

Fun Gasoline Factoid: The Colonial Pipeline

April 17, 2005

The Colonial Pipeline is the on-land pipeline system connecting US Gulf Coast refineries to Southeast and Atlantic Coast markets. The main artery runs from Deer Park, Texas, to Linden, NJ. It has the effective capability to carry roughly 2.1 million barrels per day of clean products, including gasolines, home heating oils, diesel fuels and kerosenes. The system serves more than  280 petroleum-marketing terminals in thirteen states. Specifications required to move motor gasoline and No. 2 oil through the Colonial pipeline have become the quality standard for cargoes of these products imported on the US East Coast. Transporting a gallon of gasoline from Houston, Texas, to the New York
harbor area via the Colonial pipeline costs about 2.3 cents. Moving product through roughly 1,550 miles of pipeline typically takes three to four weeks.